Casa » volti di MIRA, Primo piano

Nel Profilo: Padre Jerry Tobin

21 Giugno 2012 No Comment

Padre Jerry Tobin è stato ordinato nel ministero in the1960s a Chicago. Era un giovane uomo, allora, e si trovò profondamente sconcertato dal movimento dei diritti civili che è stato in aumento intorno a lui. Egli descrive che egli, come le persone più bianchi, al momento, è stato tenuto completamente all'oscuro delle ingiustizie e disuguaglianze che gli afro-americani di fronte. Si rese conto che era giunto il momento di educare se stesso. Anche se è stato già lavorando con due parrocchie nelle comunità afro-americane, he decided that he wanted to take a more strategic approach to social justice. After gaining a degree in social work, he returned to Chicago to work with Catholic Charities and make an impact in a wide variety of minority communities.

 

After many years of service with Catholic Charities, he was offered a position within the Norbertine Order’s new priory (now the Norbertine Priory of St. Moses the Black) that was being founded in Mississippi. Father Jerry realized that this new setting would offer him different opportunities, such as a chance to begin sharing his thoughts on human rights and social justice. So when he relocated to the Mississippi priory in 1990, he began writing and speaking on social justice issues.

 

Father Jerry’s communications on social justice dovetailed perfectly with the work that Bill Chandler was starting in Mississippi. Chandler was creating a coalition to advocate for immigrant rights, and according to Father Jerry, it was Chandler’s experience with labor organizing that gave MIRA the backbone of discipline and unity necessary to become truly effective.

 

Father Jerry was one of MIRA’s founding members, and has served on the board of directors ever since. He says that while other groups advocate for immigrants on a case-by-case basis, MIRA is the only Mississippi organization that affects change at a policy level. In addition to his own commitments to Mississippi’s immigrant community (he conducts mass on a weekly basis for a primarily immigrant parish in Carthage), he has been a consistent presence with MIRA at the Mississippi State Capitol. He has been able to offer a religious and human-rights based perspective on immigration issues, a perspective that he says Mississippi lawmakers recognize and respect.

 

Father Jerry remains connected with multiple ministries and parishes across the state, and participates with groups such as The Southern Human Rights Organizer’s Network and the United Auto Workers. He regularly writes for the local press (Jackson Advocate and the Clarion Ledger) and even some national publications. As he continues advocating for human and immigrant rights, his biggest hope for MIRA is that it will gain more resources. Greater resources would mean not only continuing the causebut expanding MIRA’s role and increasing the scope of its advocacy across the state.

 

Lascia la tua risposta!

Aggiungi il tuo commento qui sotto, o trackback dal tuo sito. È anche possibile iscriverti a questi commenti via RSS.

Be Nice. Keep it clean. Rimani in argomento. No spam.