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The Unclaimed Dead

19 Julio 2017 No hay Comentarios
 Graduate student Devora Gleiber photographs a donor’s body during human decomposition research at Texas State University’s Forensic Anthropology Research Facility in San Marcos, Texas, May 12, 2016. Photo by Robert Shults

Graduate student Devora Gleiber photographs a donor’s body during human decomposition research at Texas State University’s Forensic Anthropology Research Facility in San Marcos, Texas, Mayo 12, 2016. Photo by Robert Shults

porRyan Devereaux and Robert Shults

Julio 18, 2017

Cortesía The Intercept

The bodies are typically found by accident. A decaying corpse drying out in the Texas sun, stumbled upon by a hunter or ranch hand. A call might be placed to the sheriff’s office or the remains might be loaded into the back of a pickup truck. Often, they will be delivered to a rural cemetery where paperwork may or may not be filled out before they are lowered into a hole in some unclaimed corner of the graveyard. Sometimes, a tin marker bearing words such as “unidentified male” or “unidentified female” will be left to signal the deceased’s final resting place, but often not. And so it has been for years in Brooks County, an expanse of sprawling ranches some 75 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border, where more than 550 dead migrants have been found since 2009, marking the highest total for any county in the state.

The Unclaimed Dead

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